Author Topic: The Black Market for Firearms  (Read 93443 times)

Ibrahim90

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #75 on: February 26, 2015, 05:43:08 PM »
And if you thought is was hard to stop people making GUNS, think about how easily you can make a BOW:


A PVC pipe, a heat gun, and some paracord.

whenever I get around to making one myself, I'm considering making some....alterations to the PVC bow. Doubtless there are ways of making them stronger: this bow is a pussy in comparison to ones from back home made of traditional materials (no offense to Skallagrim--love the guy).
"All you guys complaining about the possibility of guy on guy relationships...you're also denying us girl on girl.  Works both ways if you know what I mean"

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MrBogosity

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #76 on: May 02, 2018, 04:06:41 PM »
The Luty SMG made with hardware store parts.


Skm1091

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« Last Edit: August 05, 2019, 04:21:44 AM by Skm1091 »

Ibrahim90

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #78 on: August 06, 2019, 07:01:54 PM »
Hey there, I am back again.

A relatively sophisticated gun manufacturing plant, using an actual machine shop as a front, has been discovered in Montreal, Canada.


Bellow are some articles and blog posts on this subject.

https://www.guns.com/news/2018/04/19/photos-surface-of-canadian-underground-gun-factory

https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2018/05/28/these-guns-were-used-in-gta-crimes-their-manufacturer-said-he-thought-they-were-for-paintball.html

https://homemadeguns.wordpress.com/2018/04/20/photos-of-illegal-tec-9-submachine-gun-factory-operating-in-montreal/

https://homemadeguns.wordpress.com/2015/12/17/tec-9-dc9-copy-seized-in-canada/

Quite surprising to see it in Canada--if only because, restrictive by US standards as they are, firearms are still easier to get than in Europe.

Then again, I suppose any restriction creates incentive for this.
"All you guys complaining about the possibility of guy on guy relationships...you're also denying us girl on girl.  Works both ways if you know what I mean"

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Skm1091

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #79 on: August 06, 2019, 09:19:13 PM »
Quite surprising to see it in Canada--if only because, restrictive by US standards as they are, firearms are still easier to get than in Europe.

Then again, I suppose any restriction creates incentive for this.

Canada's laws are restrictive in some ways, but they are also less stringent than the US in other ways. For Example: You can buy short-barreled shotguns more easily in Canada than the US, which require ATF approval and a 200 dollar tax. One of the articles I posted, did say that Montreal is home of Canada's gun registration scheme and has the strictest laws in North America so I guess that could be an incentive. Another one could be demand for fully-automatic weapons (if these really are full-auto, because the articles don't really go into detail).

Also, I think we are seeing this because of the proliferation of technology. 20 or 30 years ago computer aided machine tools were limited to large scale industrial operations And now they could be had for less than 3 grand in some cases. I think this is only the beginning of what is to come.

Speaking of Europe, it really depends on your location. Guns are more readily available in Serbia than the United Kingdom, for example. In fact in much of the former Yugoslavia there are still many weapons leftover from the wars during the 1990s. Many of them were hidden away by private collectors, people who thought it would not be wise to turn in their weapons in case another conflict breaks out, or sold to criminal groups who want to make quick buck.
« Last Edit: August 07, 2019, 12:54:50 AM by Skm1091 »

Ibrahim90

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #80 on: August 07, 2019, 08:00:35 PM »
Canada's laws are restrictive in some ways, but they are also less stringent than the US in other ways. For Example: You can buy short-barreled shotguns more easily in Canada than the US, which require ATF approval and a 200 dollar tax. One of the articles I posted, did say that Montreal is home of Canada's gun registration scheme and has the strictest laws in North America so I guess that could be an incentive. Another one could be demand for fully-automatic weapons (if these really are full-auto, because the articles don't really go into detail).

Also, I think we are seeing this because of the proliferation of technology. 20 or 30 years ago computer aided machine tools were limited to large scale industrial operations And now they could be had for less than 3 grand in some cases. I think this is only the beginning of what is to come.

Speaking of Europe, it really depends on your location. Guns are more readily available in Serbia than the United Kingdom, for example. In fact in much of the former Yugoslavia there are still many weapons leftover from the wars during the 1990s. Many of them were hidden away by private collectors, people who thought it would not be wise to turn in their weapons in case another conflict breaks out, or sold to criminal groups who want to make quick buck.

Yes, it was admittedly a generalization, that doesn't apply either to the Balkans, or the Chzech Republic and Hungary.
"All you guys complaining about the possibility of guy on guy relationships...you're also denying us girl on girl.  Works both ways if you know what I mean"

-Jesse Cox

Skm1091

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #81 on: August 07, 2019, 08:31:49 PM »
Yes, it was admittedly a generalization, that doesn't apply either to the Balkans, or the Chzech Republic and Hungary.

You got that right. Speaking of the United Kingdom.


https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-sussex-48202765

https://nationalcrimeagency.gov.uk/news/pair-jailed-for-supplying-guns-made-at-hailsham-firearms-factory

https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2019/05/08/fn-1922-pistol-copies-produced-in-illegal-gun-factory-in-sussex-uk/


Apparently the NCA (UK's FBI) has discovered a machine shop that was producing, what appears to be, somewhat rough copies of FN/Browning 1922 handguns, which is a bigger variant of the FN_Model_1910. In the video, they say this is the first time they have seen something like this. But assure you this is not gonna be the last.

A Clear example of the proliferation of technology. I won't be surprised if within the next 5-10 years we start seeing 9mm handguns being produced.

Skm1091

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #82 on: August 11, 2019, 01:26:45 AM »
Back again with more breaking news. There is now a 12 gauge revolving pump shotgun combining metal and 3d printed parts. This is getting interesting.

https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2019/07/17/the-liberator12k-a-diy-3d-printed-12-gauge-revolving-shotgun/


The designer seemed to have taken some inspiration from the Armsel_Striker shotgun. See the resemblance?

Skm1091

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Re: The Black Market for Firearms
« Reply #83 on: August 18, 2019, 10:56:43 PM »
Here is another interesting development.

https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2019/08/14/fgc-9-3d-printed-gun/

https://www.reddit.com/r/Firearms/comments/cr87ar/100_dollars_in_unregulated_material_never_looked/

Some would consider this a milestone in the fight against gun control and 3d printing capabilities.
A 3d printed 9mm carbine that is designed to circumvent EU style gun laws, which regulates the pressure bearing parts, aka the toughest parts of the firearm to machine.

The group that has created this firearm has also created a relatively simply way to make a rifled barrel via electro-chemical machining. This is quite revolutionary, because barrels are one of the most time consuming and challenging part of a firearm to produce through traditional means.