Author Topic: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies  (Read 70662 times)

Travis Retriever

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #30 on: September 30, 2009, 08:55:47 PM »
I don't know.
That's what he just said.
"When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole worldó'No. You move.'"
-Captain America, Amazing Spider-Man 537

Lord T Hawkeye

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #31 on: October 04, 2009, 09:14:47 AM »
Here's one I'm dealing with now.

In a discussion, I made a joke that everyone who uses the word "lulz" is wrong.  I did go on to address the points as normal but now people won't shut up about my horrible ad hominem attack and ignore all the rest.

So what's the fallacy here?  Taking something seriously that was obviously in jest and using that as an argument?  Is it just quote mining?
I recently heard that the word heretic is derived from the greek work heriticos which means "able to choose"
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MrBogosity

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #32 on: October 04, 2009, 09:18:00 AM »
I guess that would be a quote-mine, yeah. He ignored the meat of your comment and misrepresented the part he did quote.

Virgil0211

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #33 on: October 04, 2009, 09:44:33 AM »
Could also be considered part argumentum ad fallacium as well. (Am I spelling that right?)

Just fire back that the fact that they refuse to address your actual points says alot about the strength of their own.

Lord T Hawkeye

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #34 on: October 04, 2009, 04:45:57 PM »
This one drives me nuts too.  Posting a MASSIVE wall of text and then berating me for misunderstanding their point when in truth, they were being so vague and ambiguous that their point could have been anything.
I recently heard that the word heretic is derived from the greek work heriticos which means "able to choose"
The more you know...

MrBogosity

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #35 on: October 09, 2009, 07:59:20 AM »
How about this one:

I just called out the anti-vaxxers for their Bogosity on my Facebook page. I was accused of denying their free speech.

We see this with the religious, too: they can make whatever claims they want, but when we debunk them or merely state our opinion we're accused of violating their freedom of religion.

In my opinion, this is a very disgusting fallacy that deserves a very disgusting name. Any ideas?

Travis Retriever

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #36 on: October 09, 2009, 12:56:26 PM »
Oh, God.
I'm a subscriber of various internet trolls (ultraforge, Morrakiu/AryanTroll, SylvesterFox, etc) and the former has complained of furries doing the same thing.

As for a name for it...I dunno.
"Flaggot Fallacy" because the people using it often flag videos expressing said opinions?
"Fail Speech Fallacy" for failing to recognize what "free speech" means, or that we have it too?
"When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole worldó'No. You move.'"
-Captain America, Amazing Spider-Man 537

Virgil0211

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #37 on: October 09, 2009, 01:38:20 PM »
Anybody have any idea what logical fallacy/fallacies resulted in Obama getting the nobel peace prize?

MrBogosity

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #38 on: October 09, 2009, 01:47:57 PM »
Anybody have any idea what logical fallacy/fallacies resulted in Obama getting the nobel peace prize?

You mean the fallacy that he's not a warmongering tyrant who continually bombs Pakistan, invaded Somalia, and is telling the exact same lies to get us into Iran that Bush told us to get into Iraq?

I think that's just a delusion.

Lord T Hawkeye

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #39 on: October 09, 2009, 10:33:57 PM »
Just watched Ron Paul's take on it.  I love his inconvenient observation that at the time the application for the award was due, Obama had been president for a grand total of 12 days.

Interesting...

First Al Gore then this.  To suggest those two are on the same level as Norman Borlaug?  Outrageous!
« Last Edit: October 09, 2009, 10:39:28 PM by Lord T Hawkeye »
I recently heard that the word heretic is derived from the greek work heriticos which means "able to choose"
The more you know...

MrBogosity

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #40 on: October 24, 2009, 08:57:06 PM »
Here's another one: argumentum ad servitus, or "appeal to slavery." This is when someone denounces a society, philosophy, policy, or economic theory by comparing it to slavery. Of course, if the person makes a legitimate comparison, it's not a fallacy; the fallacy comes from comparing something to slavery in order to make appeal to ridicule or poisoning the well fallacy. Since it covers these and several other fallacies as well, I think it should be considered one of its own.

It's kind of similar to Godwin's Law, so maybe the person who makes the comparison should be considered to have lost the argument.

Lord T Hawkeye

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #41 on: October 25, 2009, 02:09:14 AM »
Here's another one: argumentum ad servitus, or "appeal to slavery." This is when someone denounces a society, philosophy, policy, or economic theory by comparing it to slavery. Of course, if the person makes a legitimate comparison, it's not a fallacy; the fallacy comes from comparing something to slavery in order to make appeal to ridicule or poisoning the well fallacy. Since it covers these and several other fallacies as well, I think it should be considered one of its own.

It's kind of similar to Godwin's Law, so maybe the person who makes the comparison should be considered to have lost the argument.

Hmm...got a good example?  Trying to visualize it.
I recently heard that the word heretic is derived from the greek work heriticos which means "able to choose"
The more you know...

MrBogosity

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #42 on: October 25, 2009, 08:48:11 AM »
Socialists and liberals love pulling this one. They compare someone voluntarily working for a company for an agreed-upon price to be slavery. They usually use this to justify policies like Minimum Wage.

Travis Retriever

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #43 on: October 25, 2009, 02:02:18 PM »
Here's another one: argumentum ad servitus, or "appeal to slavery." This is when someone denounces a society, philosophy, policy, or economic theory by comparing it to slavery. Of course, if the person makes a legitimate comparison, it's not a fallacy; the fallacy comes from comparing something to slavery in order to make appeal to ridicule or poisoning the well fallacy. Since it covers these and several other fallacies as well, I think it should be considered one of its own.

It's kind of similar to Godwin's Law, so maybe the person who makes the comparison should be considered to have lost the argument.
It sounds like a poisoning the well fallacy.
"When the mob and the press and the whole world tell you to move, your job is to plant yourself like a tree beside the river of truth, and tell the whole worldó'No. You move.'"
-Captain America, Amazing Spider-Man 537

Lord T Hawkeye

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Re: Unnamed(?) logical fallacies
« Reply #44 on: October 25, 2009, 08:09:13 PM »
Socialists and liberals love pulling this one. They compare someone voluntarily working for a company for an agreed-upon price to be slavery. They usually use this to justify policies like Minimum Wage.

Oh yeah!  Friend of mine who sounded off on me because I fail to see the problem with sweat shops if the employees all work there at their own free will.  Oh no!  We must speak for those poor ignorant victims for they are completely incapable of making their own decisions!

People call me nasty in debates but I prefer to think of it as giving collectivists the same respect they give their fellow man: None.
I recently heard that the word heretic is derived from the greek work heriticos which means "able to choose"
The more you know...